Like IPv6 link-local addresses, these APIPA addresses are usable addresses for unicast communications within a single broadcast domain on the LAN. Link-Local Address as Default Gateway. Link-local IPv6 addresses are on every interface of every IPv6-enabled host and router. They are essential for LAN-based Neighbor Discovery communication.

Like IPv6 link-local addresses, these APIPA addresses are usable addresses for unicast communications within a single broadcast domain on the LAN. Link-Local Address as Default Gateway. Link-local IPv6 addresses are on every interface of every IPv6-enabled host and router. They are essential for LAN-based Neighbor Discovery communication. IPv6 has had two versions of private addressing - deprecated site-local addressing and the current Unique Local Unicast Addresses (ULAs). Having had some involvement in the site-local deprecation discussions and the subsequent ULA discussions in the IETF, starting in 2002, I've since seen several examples of ULAs being incorrectly treated as though they were the exact IPv6 equivalent of IPv6 Link Local Address is the address used between Point-to-Point interfaces and provide IPv6 Neigbor Discovery. Point-to-point interfaces do not need a Global IPv6 Addres to communicate each other. Instead, they use IPv6 Link Local Addresses for point-to-point communication.And Router do not forward these Link-Local Addresses because they are Auto-configured IPv6 address is known as Link-Local address. This address always starts with FE80. The first 16 bits of link-local address is always set to 1111 1110 1000 0000 (FE80). The next 48-bits are set to 0, thus: [Image: Link-Local Address] Link-local addresses are used for communication among IPv6 hosts on a link (broadcast segment) only. IPv6 link-local addresses are a special scope of address which can be used only within the context of a single layer two domain. Packets sourced from or destined to a link-local address are not forwarded out of the layer two domain by routers. These addresses are useful for establishing communication across a link in the absence of a globally IPv6-enabled network interfaces usually have more than one IPv6 address, for example, a link-local and a global address. They may also have temporary addresses that change after a certain lifetime has expired. IPv6 introduces the concepts of address scope and selection preference, yielding multiple choices for source and destination address Routing protocols in IPv6 use the link-local addresses of routers as next-hop addresses so again, the communication based on link-local addresses must actually be possible. However, when you have a look at an IPv6 routing table, a network together with a link-local next-hop address will always be identified together with the outgoing interface:

There are multiple IPv6 RFCs that explain aspects of IPv6 link-local addressing. RFC 4291, IP Version 6 Addressing Architecture, Section 2.5.6 Link-Local IPv6 Unicast Addresses: Link-Local addresses are designed to be used for addressing on a single link for purposes such as automatic address configuration, neighbor discovery, or when no

Link-local addresses are used only in communication between nodes on the same local link. A link-local address uses a link-local prefix of FE80::/10 as the first 10 bits (1111111010 in binary) and an interface ID as the last 64 bits. When IPv6 runs on a node, a link-local address that consists of a fixed prefix and an interface ID in EUI-64 The link-local address of a node is the combination of the prefix fe80::/64 and the 64-bit interface identifier expressed in IPv6 colon-hexadecimal notation. Therefore, the link-local address of this example node with the prefix fe80::/64 and the interface identifier 02-60-08-ff-fe-52-f9-d8 is fe80::260:8ff:fe52:f9d8. For IPv6 link-local addresses (fe80::/10 prefix), the sin6_scope_id member in the sockaddr_in6 structure is the interface number. For IPv6 site-local addresses (fec0::/10 prefix), the sin6_scope_id member in the sockaddr_in6 structure is a site identifier. An example of a link-local IPv6 address on interface #5 is the following: An IPv6 link-local address is an equivalent of IPv4's: APIPA addres. Which of the answers listed below refers to an IPv6 link-local address? FE80::/64 ( Your answer) Which of the following answers lists a valid address of FE80:00A7:0000:0000:02AA:0000:4C00:FE9A after compression?

IPv6 link-local addresses are a special scope of address which can be used only within the context of a single layer two domain. Packets sourced from or destined to a link-local address are not forwarded out of the layer two domain by routers. These addresses are useful for establishing communication across a link in the absence of a globally

There are multiple IPv6 RFCs that explain aspects of IPv6 link-local addressing. RFC 4291, IP Version 6 Addressing Architecture, Section 2.5.6 Link-Local IPv6 Unicast Addresses: Link-Local addresses are designed to be used for addressing on a single link for purposes such as automatic address configuration, neighbor discovery, or when no